AK DOC Today

News, Events, and Activities in the Alaska Department of Corrections

Juneau Rotarians build greenhouse at Lemon Creek Correctional Center

Volunteers from the Juneau Rotary Club are constructing a greenhouse inside the secure area of Lemon Creek Correctional Center. “It’ll be a combination of the inmates being able to work here, gain skill in gardening and then be able to use the produce that they generate here,” said Rotarian Wayne Jensen, an architect who is helping with the project. The greenhouse, which measures 40 feet in length by 15 feet wide and costs $13,000, all raised by the local Rotary club. When operating, inmates and community volunteers will grow vegetables and flowers.

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Amber Crawford Mat-Su Pretrial Employee of the Quarter

BAIID Conference

Employee of the Quarter Amber Crawford is presented with a letter confirming the award by Lt. Tim Routen.

Amber Crawford has been selected as Employee of the Quarter (April-June 2012) at Mat-Su Pretrial Facility. “She was nominated by her peers for the professional and courteous manner in which she interacts with staff and for her extremely positive and happy attitude. During much of this quarter she had been filling both the Accounting Clerk and Administrative Manager positions and in doing so remained helpful, dedicated. Despite her double duties she continued to consider the needs of staff and did whatever she could to make THEIR jobs easier. She was described by one of her nominees as ‘our ray of sunshine!,'” said Superintendent Steve Brunger. The MSPT Employee Recognition Committee thanked Ms. Crawford for her sacrifice, dedication, excellent service and sunny disposition. As Employee of the Quarter she will also be considered at the end of the year for Employee of the Year.

DOC participants gain working knowledge at BAIID conference

BAIID Conference

Conference participants, from left, Probation Officer Chris McKenzie, Probation Officer Stefanie Hayes, Procurement Manager John Schauwecker

The Department of Corrections is the agency which is responsible for certifying BAIIDs … that’s Blood Alcohol Ignition Interlock Devices. That task falls on Procurement, which is why procurement chief John Schauwecker participated in a two-day conference at the Anchorage Police Department training center July 23-24th. Regulations require BAIID vendors to report violations – for example when the device prevents a car from starting because the operator’s breath alcohol level is too high. For that reason Probation Officers Chris McKenzie and Stefanie Hayes attended the conference with a goal of learning more about the devices and how to access reports of violations by probationers required to use the devices. The conference was conducted by Ottawa, Canada-based Traffic Injury Research Foundation.

Goose Creek honored by Design-Build Institute

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Goose Creek Correctional Center, just prior to opening.

Goose Creek Correctional Center has been honored with a national award by the Design-Build Institute of America (DBIA). The prestigious award is one of the highest recognitions of achievement in the design-build industry. The award is based on:

  • The integrated cooperative relationships developed between the Department of Corrections, Neeser Construction, Inc. (the design-build contractor), the Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska Planning and Architecture, Steve Fishback, Architect, RISE Alaska, and Neeser’s design team.
  • Cooperative cost control efforts
  • Quality, Functionality and Aesthetics of the facility,
  • Long-term energy efficiency,
  • Achievement of the proposed project schedule,
  • Incorporation of innovative systems.

The project and all of its participating entities will be recognized at the DBIA National Design Build Conference and Expo on November 8 in New Orleans.

Young Offenders Graduate with Honors at Spring Creek

Spring Creek Correctional Center conducted graduation commencement ceremonies for six high school graduates and two college graduates on June 21st. The ceremony marked the 13th and final year for the Youthful Offender Program ant Spring Creek. Over 200 prisoners have received their high school diploma as a result of this innovative program. The YOP is moving to the Anchorage Complex this coming school year to better serve participants who may have not been convicted or sentenced but remain in custody. The Anchorage School district will now work with ACC staff in the delivery of the program.

YKCC Distributes Donated Fish Fillets

Federal enforcement of a local subsistence fishery closure on the Kuskokwim River and tributaries became a major news event in Bethel. When the federal enforcement agency seized 79 salmon, they approached the Yukon Kuskokwim Correctional Center and offered the fish, which needed immediate processing and freezing. YKCC accepted the fish and an inmate work crew filed and packaged the fish for freezing. YKCC then turned over the processed fish to a pair of local organizations for distribution to elders and others with need. The Tundra Women’s Coalition accepted two totes of filets while the Eddie Hoffman Senior Center – which also serves as a local food bank – accepted three totes of the frozen filets. Both agencies accepted a single tote of frozen fish heads, which will be used to make a rich soup considered a local delicacy.

SPOT program begins at Wildwood Correctional Center

The Wildwood Correctional Center Minimum Camp has started a dog program. The program was originally started by Hiland Mountain and has proven to be a very successful community partnership.

Wildwood Correctional Center has inaugurated a SPOT (Special Pet Obedience Training) program and its first dog is MILO, an Australian Shepherd. MILO will remain at the minimum camp and be the ambassador dog for the program, said Assistant Superintendent Shannon McCloud.

“Once training has begun and the inmate handlers understand the process, a dog from the local animal shelter will be placed at the facility, and when basic training is complete, the local pet shelter will work on placement of the dog with a family,” McCloud said. “So far the program has been positive therapy for inmates and staff. It is hoped that the program will grow in the future as more handlers are trained to work within the program.”