AK DOC Today

News, Events, and Activities in the Alaska Department of Corrections

DOC increases Valdez jail contract for sentenced EM supervision

From the Valdez Star: “Dean Williams, Alaska’s commissioner of the Dept. of Corrections, came to Valdez Thursday and signed an agreement with Valdez mayor Jeremy O’Neil that will allow low-level offenders to serve sentences via electronic monitoring rather than serving time in jail.

Williams said it is a big trajectory change for Valdez – and the Dept. of Corrections. Allowing lawbreakers to serve time at home gives local control over offenders rather than sending people to prison, which the commissioner said can be a university to teach criminal behavior.”

Read more, here: https://www.valdezstar.net/story/2018/10/10/law-enforcement/short-jail-sentences-now-eligible-for-monitoring-instead/2069.html?fbclid=IwAR0xAmYA_ZukveNyuVogq5Y-iNmET8jFgfqpEjMIyAr4ma2SCBzvGa9AwK4

DOC releases September drug report

Once drugs are discovered, they’re turned over to the department’s Professional Conduct Unit (PCU).

PCU builds cases and works with other law enforcement entities — like the FBI – Federal Bureau of InvestigationAlaska State Troopers (Official) and the Drug Enforcement Administration — to go after traffickers.

This work and collaboration is critical to building a safer Alaska.

State plan could put prisoners to work in Unalaska seafood plants

“If local officials agree, prisoners can finish their sentences working in seafood plants in Unalaska, according to a plan presented by Alaska Department of Corrections Commissioner Dean Williams at a recent Unalaska City Council meeting, attended by many generally supportive community members,” the Bristol Bay Times/Dutch Harbor Fisherman reported.

Read the story, here: https://www.adn.com/business-economy/2018/10/08/state-plan-could-put-prisoners-to-work-in-unalaska-seafood-plants/

DOC releases August drug seizure report

Our correctional officers work diligently everyday to keep drugs and other contraband out of our facilities. When drugs are discovered, our Professional Conduct Unit works with other law enforcement entities to build cases that go after traffickers.

Thank you to all of our COs and PCU investigators for helping to build a Safer Alaska.

#MyAKGov #SaferAlaska

 

DOC releases July drug seizure report

Our correctional officers work diligently everyday to keep drugs and other contraband out of our facilities. When drugs are discovered, our Professional Conduct Unit works with other law enforcement entities to build cases that go after traffickers.

Thank you to all of our COs and PCU investigators for helping to build a Safer Alaska.

Institutional Investigator Certification graduates its first class

The Department of Corrections recently graduated its first 16 correctional officers trained as Institutional Investigators from the Anchorage Correctional Complex. The two day, 16-hour Institutional Investigator class was designed to provide officers investigative guidelines, knowledge, and skills in order to affect prosecutable criminal cases and to assist the Alaska State Troopers and DOC Investigators to properly preserve, document, and investigate crimes within DOC institutions.

The officers were instructed by ex-law enforcement officers and current DOC investigators Glen Klinkhart, Troy Henley, and Berni Troglio.

Over the two day class officers learned such investigative skills as:

  • Criminal Law
  • Crime Scene Response
  • Protection of a crime scene
  • Investigative Documentation
  • Crime Scene Photography
  • Physical Evidence Collection
  • Diagramming
  • Evidence Packaging
  • Interviewing and Interrogation
  • Report Writing

For the officers final project the new investigators had to respond to a simulated crime scene, develop a plan to properly preserve and document the scene, and properly seize all of the potential evidence. The students then had to locate and interview victims, witnesses, and suspects all the while attempting to develop a criminal case based upon the evidence seized.

Some of the feedback from the students included:

“The instructors were very engaged and entertaining.”

“The instructor was very knowledgeable and presented the information in an energetic manner in a low stress way.”

“The scenarios were right on point and the snacks were a nice touch!”

“I enjoyed the hands-on portions of the class as well as the case studies that were presented.”

“Every correctional officer should be equipped with this kind of knowledge.”

At the Anchorage Correctional Center those officers who passed the class are eligible to use some new tools, including one of several smart phones designed to assist in taking photographs, video, interviews, and diagramming potential crime scenes.

  

Meet Superintendent Lapinskas: How the DOC crew got their start in public service

Our organization is made up of all kinds of people, many with years or decades of dedicated public service under their belts. Our state is safer and stronger because of their knowledge and hearts for helping and protecting their communities.

Over the course of the following weeks and months, we’ll be telling the stories of our DOC family and sharing how they got their start in public service.

Take a look at that #tbt picture below; that’s Bill Lapinskas in 1988. At the time, he was a squad boss on the Chugach #1 Fire Crew and dispatched to Idaho. This picture was snapped in the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness which is in the Nez Pearce National Forest.

A lot’s changed since then. Bill joined DOC in 1993 and worked his way up the ranks. Now, he’s the superintendent of the Spring Creek Correctional Center, our maximum-security prison in Seward.

But to do this day, Bill says his time as a wildland firefighter “was one of the most rewarding jobs I ever had.”

We’re so grateful to have Bill on our team. He’s a great leader, and his dedication to public service is nothing short of inspiring. Thanks for everything you do, Superintendent.

Nome Screening of ‘Breaking the Cycle’ + Conversation w/ DOC about what AK can learn from Norway

The Department of Corrections presents a screening of the documentary, “Breaking the Cycle.” The hour-long film follows the warden of Halden — Norway’s most humane prison that’s showing promising results — tours the U.S. prison system to discuss the importance of rehabilitation in incarceration.

The screening will follow a discussion and Q & A with Commissioner Dean Williams.

Watch the trailer, here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3QNCwLEobZI

The event is free to the public.