AK DOC Today

News, Events, and Activities in the Alaska Department of Corrections

DOC releases August drug seizure report

Our correctional officers work diligently everyday to keep drugs and other contraband out of our facilities. When drugs are discovered, our Professional Conduct Unit works with other law enforcement entities to build cases that go after traffickers.

Thank you to all of our COs and PCU investigators for helping to build a Safer Alaska.

#MyAKGov #SaferAlaska

 

DOC releases July drug seizure report

Our correctional officers work diligently everyday to keep drugs and other contraband out of our facilities. When drugs are discovered, our Professional Conduct Unit works with other law enforcement entities to build cases that go after traffickers.

Thank you to all of our COs and PCU investigators for helping to build a Safer Alaska.

Institutional Investigator Certification graduates its first class

The Department of Corrections recently graduated its first 16 correctional officers trained as Institutional Investigators from the Anchorage Correctional Complex. The two day, 16-hour Institutional Investigator class was designed to provide officers investigative guidelines, knowledge, and skills in order to affect prosecutable criminal cases and to assist the Alaska State Troopers and DOC Investigators to properly preserve, document, and investigate crimes within DOC institutions.

The officers were instructed by ex-law enforcement officers and current DOC investigators Glen Klinkhart, Troy Henley, and Berni Troglio.

Over the two day class officers learned such investigative skills as:

  • Criminal Law
  • Crime Scene Response
  • Protection of a crime scene
  • Investigative Documentation
  • Crime Scene Photography
  • Physical Evidence Collection
  • Diagramming
  • Evidence Packaging
  • Interviewing and Interrogation
  • Report Writing

For the officers final project the new investigators had to respond to a simulated crime scene, develop a plan to properly preserve and document the scene, and properly seize all of the potential evidence. The students then had to locate and interview victims, witnesses, and suspects all the while attempting to develop a criminal case based upon the evidence seized.

Some of the feedback from the students included:

“The instructors were very engaged and entertaining.”

“The instructor was very knowledgeable and presented the information in an energetic manner in a low stress way.”

“The scenarios were right on point and the snacks were a nice touch!”

“I enjoyed the hands-on portions of the class as well as the case studies that were presented.”

“Every correctional officer should be equipped with this kind of knowledge.”

At the Anchorage Correctional Center those officers who passed the class are eligible to use some new tools, including one of several smart phones designed to assist in taking photographs, video, interviews, and diagramming potential crime scenes.

  

Meet Superintendent Lapinskas: How the DOC crew got their start in public service

Our organization is made up of all kinds of people, many with years or decades of dedicated public service under their belts. Our state is safer and stronger because of their knowledge and hearts for helping and protecting their communities.

Over the course of the following weeks and months, we’ll be telling the stories of our DOC family and sharing how they got their start in public service.

Take a look at that #tbt picture below; that’s Bill Lapinskas in 1988. At the time, he was a squad boss on the Chugach #1 Fire Crew and dispatched to Idaho. This picture was snapped in the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness which is in the Nez Pearce National Forest.

A lot’s changed since then. Bill joined DOC in 1993 and worked his way up the ranks. Now, he’s the superintendent of the Spring Creek Correctional Center, our maximum-security prison in Seward.

But to do this day, Bill says his time as a wildland firefighter “was one of the most rewarding jobs I ever had.”

We’re so grateful to have Bill on our team. He’s a great leader, and his dedication to public service is nothing short of inspiring. Thanks for everything you do, Superintendent.

Nome Screening of ‘Breaking the Cycle’ + Conversation w/ DOC about what AK can learn from Norway

The Department of Corrections presents a screening of the documentary, “Breaking the Cycle.” The hour-long film follows the warden of Halden — Norway’s most humane prison that’s showing promising results — tours the U.S. prison system to discuss the importance of rehabilitation in incarceration.

The screening will follow a discussion and Q & A with Commissioner Dean Williams.

Watch the trailer, here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3QNCwLEobZI

The event is free to the public.

 

DOC releases June drug seizure report

Our dedicated officers work daily to keep drugs out of our facilities. When drugs are discovered, they’re turned over to our Professional Conduct Unit (PCU) for further investigation.

PCU builds cases and works with other law enforcement entities — like the FBI – Federal Bureau of InvestigationDrug Enforcement Administration – DEA, and Alaska State Troopers (Official) — to go after drug traffickers.

Thank you to our dedicated employees for their work helping to build a Safer Alaska.

 

Tickets on sale: ‘Breaking the Cycle’ and discussion w/ Commissioner Williams about what Alaska can learn from Norway

Tickets are on sale for the screening of the hour-long documentary, “Breaking the Cycle” and a community conversation with Commissioner Dean Williams about what Alaska can learn from the Norway model.

In  the film, the Warden of Halden, Norway’s most humane prison, tours the U.S. prison system to urge a new approach emphasizing on rehabilitation. The documentary tells the story about Jan Strømnes, the deputy warden in the world’s most humane maximum-security prison, Halden Prison in Norway. Strømnes goes on a mission to change one of the most notorious prisons in the world – Attica Correctional Facility in New York State.

Buy tickets, here: https://ticketing.us.veezi.com/purchase/3683?siteToken=suuxCH9wIUGD05u30RvJ%2Fw%3D%3D . 

 

Corrections seeks alternatives to halfway houses

“Alaska’s Department of Corrections is starting to test alternatives to the halfway house system in an effort to reduce the number of offenders who commit new crimes after they’re released from prison.

Corrections Commissioner Dean Williams said it doesn’t make sense to keep doing things the same way, when the majority of prisoners cycle in and out of state custody,” KTOO reported Thursday. 

Read more, here.

Upcoming DOC events

The Department of Corrections is hosting two upcoming educational events. These are both open to staff and the public. We hope you’ll join us.

June 14, 2018 on Facebook Live: In the latest installment of Chit-Chat w/ Commissioner Williams, we’ll be discussing the expanding cannery work-release program and taking a virtual tour of the facility. By tapping into one of Alaska’s resources, DOC will be able to teach job skills and provide employment opportunities to individuals nearing the end of their sentences.

Share the event or post questions on Facebook.

July 23, 2018 at Bear Tooth: The Department of Corrections presents a screening of the documentary, “Breaking the Cycle.” The hour-long film follows the warden of Halden — Norway’s most humane prison that’s showing promising results — tours the U.S. prison system to discuss the importance of rehabilitation in incarceration.

The screening will follow a discussion and Q & A with Commissioner Dean Williams, Wildwood Superintendent Shannon McCloud, and more.

Tickets are $4. They go on sale online and in the box office July 10, 2018. Buy them, here.

More: https://www.facebook.com/events/195405034616625/permalink/195409167949545/

See you there!

 

After 56 years, Pastor Bill White retires

After 56 years working in prison ministries, Pastor Bill White has retired. This milestone is well-deserved, and we thank him from the bottom of our hearts for all that he’s done.

White, 84, was born in Tennessee. At 17, in 1950, he was called to the ministry. One year later, and until 1956, he served as a missionary in Palmer. There, he helped build the Church of God.

He met his wife, Margaret, while in Florida. The two tied the knot on June 8, 1957. Together, the newlyweds moved to Ketchikan, arriving on June 7, 1960. The Whites celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary this past summer.

When Pastor White was just starting off in Ketchikan, he converted a two-bedroom warehouse, with about 20 members. More than five decades later, about 120 people attend his church.

All the while, Pastor White has been involved with prison ministries, and has spent decades ministering at the Ketchikan Correctional Center. He has been instrumental in raising up several other prison workers from his church, the Lighthouse Church of God, as well as encouraging and integrating other workers from the local Christian community. One of his members, Bruce Brown, has been conducting weekly Bible studies for over 40 years. Bruce came to know Christ through Pastor White’s ministry in Ketchikan in 1976.

At present there are several believers in the Ketchikan jail. Many who were saved in jail under Pastor White’s ministry are now active members of the Lighthouse Church of God or serving in other local churches in Ketchikan and across the nation.

There is no limit to Pastor White’s outreach. Pastor White gives love, respect and personal attention to inmates, and those who’ve been written off. Some of these inmates get few visitors, one being Pastor White on a regular basis.

Pastor White received the Chaplain Of The Year Award for 2005 from the Alaska State Chaplaincy Office. He has also received special recognition from the Church of God Prison Ministry Dept. Margaret was inducted into the Church of God International “Hall of Christian Excellence” for her service and ministry with Pastor White in Ketchikan.

Pastor White’s last official day was September 23, but he will remain as a religious provider.

Shortly before Pastor’s White’s retirement, Governor Walker penned him a congratulatory letter, which said: “Your heart of service has been clearly demonstrated as you filled a crucial role that included weekly ministry, being on call for death notifications, and recruiting and training volunteers, in addition to scheduling and leading services.

In addition to your service at KCC, your commitment to the community in Ketchikan is commendable. From the development of the Coal Bay Camp and Retreat, to the outreach work with the Ketchikan Ministerial Association, you have served Southeast Alaska well. The fruits of your labor and the legacy you have created will live on in your family, and in the people you have touched. Your steadfastness in service has set a positive example for future generations that will continue on in your retirement.”

Governor Walker, we couldn’t have said it any better.

Thank you, Pastor White. We’ll forever be grateful for your time, love, teachings, spirit, and dedication to you work.