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The following is a greeting given in one of the 20 indigenous languages recognized by the State of Alaska.

AK DOC Today

News, Events, and Activities in the Alaska Department of Corrections

From PED: Officers arrest defendant for VCOR, discover stolen weapon

Last week, Palmer Pretrial Enforcement Officers were contacted by a community member who said a pretrial defendant was threatening him. The officers encouraged the man to contact the Wasilla Police Department to file a formal report; meanwhile, DOC’s pretrial officers were able to follow-up with the defendant, per the defendant’s release conditions set by a judge.

When the pretrial officers arrived at the defendant’s home for field contact, they discovered a stolen pistol in the garage, and another loaded pistol in the defendant’s bedroom and several other deadly weapons. Per release conditions, the defendant was not allowed to possess any firearms.

The pretrial officers arrested the defendant for violating his release conditions, and the stolen weapon was handed over to Wasilla police.

In Alaska, pretrial defendants have always gotten out on bail. But with the creation of the Pretrial Enforcement Division, individuals released on bail are now being supervised by law enforcement. Thank you to the pretrial officers for their quick response and for helping to build a safer Alaska.

Officers support Special Olympics athletes in Torch Run

In 1981, the first Special Olympics Torch Run took place in Kansas. More than 30 years later, law enforcement officers from across the U.S. hit the road again this year to raise money for the nonprofit.

From Nome to Kodiak, the Alaska Law Enforcement Torch Run and Pledge Drive took place simultaneously in 14 Alaska communities to support more than 2,000 Special Olympics Alaska athletes.

And all of the money raised here stays right here in the Last Frontier.

Let’s hear it for all of the officers across the country who took time to participate and to support our neighbors!

Listen: Community in Unity, Life in Limbo at FCC

Some people stay at Fairbanks Correctional Center for a few days; others are there for years. Most of the inmates are living their lives in limbo — awaiting their trials and their futures. During Community in Unity: Life in Limbo, inmates, correctional center staff, and other community members sat together for an open conversation about the justice system, day-to-day life at FCC, and what’s happening on the outside to help people who are released.

Take a listen: https://www.alaskapublic.org/2018/05/19/life-in-limbo-at-the-fairbanks-correctional-center/

As prisoners imagine life on the outside, can technology help them stay out?

Listen: What role is DOC play in the criminal justice system?

Commissioner Williams joined Justice Alaska co-hosts Senior Judge Elaine Andrews and Shelly Wozniak, to take a look at life “behind the walls” of Alaska’s prisons.

Click the link below to learn more about what role the correctional system plays in the criminal justice system, what DOC is doing to lower the recidivism rate, and much more.

Take a listen: https://www.alaskapublic.org/2018/05/11/commissioner-dean-williams-on-alaska-department-of-corrections/

‘Cultivating a Positive Future’ at PMCF

Take a look at the new sign at the Point Mackenzie Correctional Farm. The sign was custom made by inmates, who even chose the slogan — “Cultivating a Positive Future.”

To pick the slogan, inmates got to submit suggestions and then vote.

The hand carved wooden bear was completed right before the Palmer Correctional Center shutdown and has now found it’s place at the farm.

Meet the GCCC Employee of the Year

Officer Angela Lincoln started her career with the State of Alaska Department of Corrections on May 15, 2014 at Goose Creek Correctional Center. She was voted employee of the month by her peers for her vigilance of constantly being watchful of potential dangers and threats within her area of work. Her dedication to DOC and to the facility she works at has not gone unnoticed — from arriving on time everyday, to finishing the tasks presented to her, to giving 110 percent every time.

Please join us in congratulating Correctional Officer Lincoln as the facilities employee of the year.

Sobering Center’s first months show success in alcohol treatment

“Alaska Department of Corrections Commissioner Dean Williams toured the center Tuesday morning and said he was incredibly pleased with the effort he’s seen on this project. 

‘I’m super excited about this place because this is about the best story there is about how a community has come together,’ Williams said. ‘This is the best thing that has happened in this particular effort in my two years as commissioner.’

Before Fairbanks had such a facility, emergency responders would often take intoxicated people to Fairbanks Correctional Center or to Fairbanks Memorial Hospital, neither of which are designed to be sobering centers,'” the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reported.

Read more: http://www.newsminer.com/news/local_news/sobering-center-s-first-months-show-success-in-alcohol-treatment/article_053aa166-5362-11e8-b378-0788cbc1eb99.html

Governor Walker sings proclamations recognizing COs and Nurses

This week is a big week for DOC, its National Correctional Officers Week and National Nurses Week. Both roles are critical to the daily functions of each of our facilities and to public safety.

Yesterday, Alaska Governor Bill Walker signed proclamations that recognize the hard work these men and women do day in and day out.

Thank you to all of our COs and nurses. The work you do does not go unnoticed. We’re thankful for your dedication to serving Alaskans.